Not just Holistic, but how to use E: All of the Above!

We made this blog because we did tons of research on success stories and research worldwide and used it on my dog with nasal cancer named Lucy. Oddly, my hobby is molecular biology. The treatment uses combination of health store supplements, some prescription meds, diet changes, and specific Ayurvedic and Chinese medicinal herbs. We just wanted her to have a better quality of life. We thought this combination of E: All the Above (except no radiation or chemo) would help that for sure, but it actually put her bleeding nasal cancer in remission!
Our approach to cancer is about treating the whole animals biologic system as natural as possible. But I do hate the word 'Holistic'. Sounds like hoo hoo. This is science based, research based data and results of using active herbal compounds that happen to be readily available and common. Some call it Nutriceuticals. Others may call it Orthomolecular cancer therapy.
WE FEEL DIVERSITY IN TREATMENT IS KEY:
-Kill the cancer cells
-Rid the cancer cells
-Remove the toxins it produces
-Make cancer cells become easier targets for the immune system
-Slow cancer cell reproduction
-Stimulate AND modulate the immune system
-Control secondary symptoms like bleeding, infection, inflammation, mucous, appetite, or pain for a better feeling animal.
-Working with your vet for exams and prescriptions that are sometimes needed when conditions are acute.
Just by using a multi-modal treatment approach that is as diverse in attack as possible. Both conventional and natural.
The body conditions that allowed it to develop in the first place must be corrected. If caught early enough, like with Lucy, this ongoing maintenance correctional treatment is all that was required at this point to achieve, so far, more than triple the life expectancy after diagnosis WITH remission. I did not use radiation or chemotherapy.
I hope this cancer research can help your dog.

July 15, 2014

If you really want to do chemo read this


"While Lucy is still doing OK, if the natural protocol she is on might no longer is work (it's been working over 3 years at this point) I still have to consider and research what still might be on the table for quality of life. I don't like chemotherapy or radiation(hate it more) but never say never till you are there. I felt I should put in the blog items on chemo and other stuff that I come across. The below has pros and cons. But either way, if you use chemotherapy you MUST use supporting supplements and herbs or the cancer will come back worse." Gary

Aust Vet J. 2004 Nov;82(11):676-80.

Treatment of eight dogs with nasal tumours with alternating doses of doxorubicin and carboplatin in conjunction with oral piroxicam.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy in the treatment of canine nasal tumours.

DESIGN:

Retrospective clinical study

PROCEDURE:

Eight dogs with histologically confirmed nasal tumours were staged by means of complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, cytological analysis of fine needle aspirate of the regional lymph nodes, thoracic radiographs and computed tomography scan of the nasal cavity. All dogs were treated with alternating doses of doxorubicin, carboplatin and oral piroxicam. All dogs were monitored for side effects of chemotherapy and evaluated for response to treatment by computed tomography scan of the nasal cavity after the first four treatments.

RESULTS:

Complete remission was achieved in four dogs, partial remission occurred in two dogs and two had stable disease on the basis of computed tomography evaluation. There was resolution of clinical signs after one to two doses of chemotherapy in all dogs.

CONCLUSIONS:

This chemotherapy protocol was efficacious and well tolerated in this series of eight cases of canine nasal tumours.



J Vet Intern Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;18(4):540-4.

Alternating carboplatin and doxorubicin as adjunctive chemotherapy to amputation or limb-sparing surgery in the treatment of appendicular osteosarcoma in dogs.

Abstract

Thirty-two dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation or limb sparing had adjuvant chemotherapy of alternating doses of carboplatin (300 mg/m2 IV) and doxorubicin (30 mg/m2 IV) every 21 days for a total of 3 cycles. Efficacy, toxicity, and previously identified prognostic factors for osteosarcoma were evaluated. The median progression free survival was 227 days (range 180-274), and the median overall survival was 320 days (range 153-487). The 1-year survival rate was 48%, and the 2-year survival rate was 18%. Age, sex, surgical procedure, and alkaline phosphatase activity above the reference ranges were not prognostic for survival. There was minimal toxicity associated with the chemotherapy. This protocol could be useful for the adjuvant treatment of appendicular osteosarcoma of dogs.
PMID:
 
15320595
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Commonly Used Chemotherapy Drugs

Doxorubicin (Adriamycin®)  Administered by IV every 2-3 weeks; side effects include those listed above and potential damage to the heart muscle. We recommend performing a heart function exam (echocardiogram) in some dogs before starting this drug. Less than 10% of all pets develop heart problems with this drug.
ADRIAMYCIN (doxorubicin) Please discuss all information with your vet
Adriamycin (doxorubicin) is a broad spectrum chemotherapy drug used to fight many forms of cancer and has been used for decades. Adriamycin is an orange-red liquid, which is diluted and painlessly administered directly into a vein. The slow intravenous administration of Adriamycin usually takes about 15 to 20 minutes. The patient lies quietly on a padded table during administration and rarely needs any form of sedation.
The dose is calculated by a measurement called Body Surface Area, which your veterinarian can calculate based on your dog's weight. Baseline complete blood count should be done before the first administration of adriamycin. You should also check with your vet about testing for kidney function and liver function. Your vet may also prescribe medicine to administer for nausea, vomiting or diarrhea which can occur (see below).
Please note: One of the major side effects of adriamycin is the potential to affect heart function. When it occurs, it usually develops after several doses. Breeds that are prone to having underlying heart conditions, dogs with a large heart on xray and dogs with a previous history of heartworm infection should have baseline EKG (heart rhythm tracing) and possibly echocardiograms (heart ultrasound) before receiving adriamycin. This is not mandatory for every dog but needs to be discussed with your veterinarian and oncologist.
Other side effects:
Hair loss: Pets rarely lose their hair, and if they do, they are not bothered by it as much as people are. In most pet animals, hair does not grow continually though out their lives like it does in people. Therefore, hair loss in pets is rare. Exceptions are certain breeds of dogs, such as poodles, Old English Sheepdogs and other breeds whose hair grows continually. In general, if your pet needs to visit a groomer periodically to be clipped, then your pet may experience some degree of hair loss as a result of chemotherapy. Cats may, however, lose all or most of their whiskers. Please ask your pet's doctor about the possibility of hair loss in your pet.
Reduction in the Number of White Blood Cells (Neutropenia): There are various types of cells in the blood. The decrease in the number of infection-fighting white blood cells is known as neutropenia. Many chemotherapeutic agents impair the bone marrow's ability to produce cells. As a result, neutropenia may occur seven to ten days after chemotherapy. Neutropenia, alone, is not a danger to your pet. However, your pet's ability to fight off infection is impaired by neutropenia. Therefore, prior to each chemotherapy treatment, your pet should have a blood test performed called a complete blood count (CBC). Should your pet have a significant reduction in the number of white blood cells, your veterinarian may wish to perform periodic blood tests, and/or prescribe antibiotics to protect your pet from infection.
Stomach or Intestinal (Gastrointestinal) Discomfort: Many patients experience some form of stomach or intestinal discomfort two or seven days after a chemotherapy treatment. Your veterinarian will prescribe medication to try to prevent or treat the discomfort. Below are listed some steps you can take at home.
Tissue damage: If Adriamycin is accidentally given outside the vein, severe tissue reactions can result, leading to tissue destruction. Therefore, Adriamycin is handled with the utmost care, and should only be administered by highly trained professionals. Secure intravenous access is paramount. If irritation of the injection site develops in the form of pain, swelling or redness, apply ice packs for 15 minutes every three hours. Call your veterinarian as soon as possible, and certainly if the condition persists for more than 24 hours.
Allergic Reactions: Allergic reaction to chemotherapeutic agents is rare, and not a problem you will have to treat at home. Should your pet have an allergic reaction to Adriamycin, it would develop upon administration, and your veterinarian and the hospital staff are trained to treat patients for allergic reaction.
Heart Damage: Adriamycin, in some rare cases, can irreversibly damage the heart muscle. The dose of Adriamycin prescribed for your pet is below the dose that usually causes heart disease. Less than 10% of patients develop heart disease as a result of Adriamycin chemotherapy. Your veterinarian will discontinue the use of Adrimycin if heart disease is detected at any time.

Find out from your oncologist what can be done to minimize the risk of heart toxicity. Ask about the use of Co Enzyme Q-10 to protect against heart disease from adriamycin. There is also a medication called Zinecard (dexrazoxane) which is used in humans to prevent toxicity from adriamycin. Ask your oncologist if your dog is a candidate for this medication if available.


Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) – Administered by IV every 3-4 weeks; side effects can include those listed above, but this drug is generally easier on the stomach and intestines.
Platinum compounds, such as carboplatin, are some of the newest agents being used in cancer therapy. They have been used with success in many types of human cancer. Although the use of these agents in animals is relatively new, they have shown promise in a variety of tumors. Carboplatin is a clear agent that is painlessly administered directly into the vein over 15-20 minutes. The patient lies quietly on a padded table during administration and rarely needs any form of sedation.
POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS OF CARBOPLATIN:
Reduction in the Number of White Blood Cells (Neutropenia). There are various types of cells in the blood. The decrease in the number of infection fighting white blood cells is known as neutropenia. Many chemotherapeutic agents impair the bone marrow's ability to produce cells. As a result, neutropenia may occur between 10 to 21 days after chemotherapy. Neutropenia alone is not a danger to your pet. However, your pet's ability to fight off infection is impaired by neutropenia. Therefore, prior to each carboplatin treatment, your pet will get a blood test called a Complete Blood Count (CBC). Should your pet have a significant reduction in the number of white blood cells, your veterinarian may wish to perform periodic blood tests, and/or prescribe antibiotics to protect your pet from infection.
Stomach or Intestinal (Gastrointestinal) Discomfort. Many patients experience some form of stomach or intestinal discomfort two to seven days after a chemotherapy treatment. Your veterinarian will prescribe medication to try to prevent or treat the discomfort. Some veterinarians recommend giving the medication even if there are no overt signs of discomfort. Please discuss this with your vet. 
 
Piroxicam (Feldene®) Administered by mouth daily. This is simply a COX-2 inhibitor like Advil/Ibuprofen but made for dogs. Dogs cannot take Ibuprofen, that is toxic to dogs.  This drug can cause ulcers in the stomach or intestine. Notify your pet’s clinician if you observe loss of appetite, vomiting, or dark/tarlike stools, which could be a sign of digested blood from an ulcer. (I USE MELOXICAM IT HAS SOMEWHAT LESS SIDE EFFECTS AND I ALWAYS USE IT WITH PEPCID OR TAGAMET)
Piroxicam, a COX‐2‐inhibiting NSAID, is a potential antiangiogenic agent since it inhibits PGE2, which has proangiogenic effects. Some tumors will up‐regulate COX‐2 enzymes resulting in increases in growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Piroxicam is the most well studied NSAID, however, additional NSAIDs are currently undergoing evaluation in cancers such as transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. The dose of piroxicam is 0.3 mg/kg daily to every other day. 



What sort of side effects may my pet have with chemotherapy?
The highest quality of life for your pet is our goal, but to be effective in controlling a devastating disease like cancer, chemotherapy drugs are very powerful. Fortunately, pets don’t have as many side effects as humans going through chemotherapy do. Hair loss (alopecia), common in humans but rare in dogs. It is seen mainly with breeds that have constantly growing hair (poodle, shih tzu, cocker spaniel, etc.). Cats generally do not lose body hair, but often lose their whiskers. Chemotherapy will slow the re-growth of hair in all pets receiving chemotherapy so grooming should be adjusted accordingly. Other potential side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea - most of which are easily controlled with medications / diet change and only last for a few days. A common side effect with many chemotherapy treatments is a decrease in the white blood cell count. This could make them more susceptible to contracting infections if the decrease is severe. You must routinely check the blood cell counts before every chemotherapy treatment to insure that the white blood cell count is not dangerously low.
Although the above are the most common potential side effects, they occur in less than 30% of the pets receiving chemotherapy. Other side effects are possible, but are often unique to individual drugs (listed above).

How should I handle body fluids while my pet is on chemotherapy?
Do not handle feces, urine or vomitus unless absolutely necessary within 24 hours of the chemo administration. If your pet has an “accident”, wear gloves and clean the area with disposable items (paper towels, baby diapers, etc.) and dispose in the trash. Wash your hands thoroughly when you are finished cleaning. In general, it is recommended that clothing/ bedding which is soiled by feces, urine or vomitus within 24 hours of chemotherapy administration should be washed twice in hot water.  (GEE THIS STUFF SOUNDS TOXIC)

 There is also another type of chemotherapy protocol, called the metronomic protocol. This protocol combines three medications: Piroxicam, deramaxx or Rimadyl (NSAIDs), doxycycline (an antibiotic) and cyclophosphamide, (an oral chemotherapy drug). These three medications work on slowing down the blood supply to cancer cells, and also slow down their growth. The principle behind this is called "anti-angiogenesis" (angiogenesis means "creation of blood vessels").


 Immunotherapy
The immune system has the ability to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. Because malignant cells express non‐self or altered self‐antigens, these cells are recognized by the immune system as different. The concept that the immune system can recognize and eliminate cancer is supported by reports of spontaneous resolution of cancer in patients that have not received treatment and the increased risk of cancer in individuals that are immunosuppressed. However, the immune system is inefficient at eliminating cancer. Malignant cells have mechanisms to evade the immune system. Also, the rapid growth of many cancers overwhelms the immune system’s ability to destroy it. Strategies have been developed to stimulate the immune system to fight off cancer. Immunotherapy is becoming a more defined and effective form of cancer therapy. (HEY THAT'S THE WHOLE POINT OF THE TIPPNER CANCER PROTOCOL THAT LUCY DOES) Varying forms of immunotherapy have proven efficacious in dogs with oral malignant melanoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma.






AND FINALLY HERE IS A LINK TO ANOTHER DOG BLOG WHO IS GOING THROUGH THIS AS WELL.










Lucy never did radiation or chemo, she only did the Tippner Protocol. The Tippner Cancer Protocol combines immunotherapy and molecular cancer therapy using off the shelf readily available inexpensive natural substances. She is past 3 years after diagnosis by biopsy

I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found

June 18, 2014

Alternates to Stasis Breaker



Human version of Dog Stasis Breaker  (a tumor buster) is available at Activeherb.com. This version, called Tumoclear is for humans but told safe for dogs.
A human version is Wei Qi Booster (immune booster) is at that company as well Tumorite at this link, you take both... 

UPDATE - I KNOW OF 2 DOGS WHO ARE USING THESE 2. I WAS TOLD THEY JUST ADJUST DOSE BY WEIGHT. ONE DOG HAD POSITIVE RESPONSE IN ABOUT A MONTH. I CALLED ACTIVEHERB AND THEY SAID IS WAS OK FOR DOGS USING ADJUSTED HUMAN DOSAGE. THE BOTTLE DOSAGE IS FOR 120 POUND HUMAN STANDARD. SO JUST ADJUST NUMBER OF PILLS FOR YOUR DOGS WEIGHT. 
I KNOW MANY OF YOU HAVE A HARD TIME GETTING YOUR VET TO ORDER THOSE RX VET HERBS STASIS BREAKER AND WEI QI BOOSTER, SO HERE IS AN ALTERNATE. THEY ARE DIFFERENT SETS OF HERBS BUT THEY DO SAME IDEAS.










Lucy never did radiation or chemo, she only did the Tippner Protocol. The Tippner Cancer Protocol combines immunotherapy and molecular cancer therapy using off the shelf readily available inexpensive natural substances. She is past 3 years after diagnosis by biopsy

I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found


May 9, 2014

Cancer immunotherapy





 Cancer immunotherapy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. There are three main groups of immunotherapy used to treat cancer: cell-based therapies, antibody therapies and cytokine therapies. They all exploit the fact that cancer cells often have subtly different molecules on their surface that can be detected by the immune system. These molecules, known as cancer antigens, are most commonly proteins but also include other molecules such as carbohydrates. Immunotherapy is used to provoke the immune system into attacking the tumor cells by using these cancer antigens as targets.

Cell-based therapies, also known as cancer vaccines, usually involve the removal of immune cells from someone with cancer, either from the blood or from a tumor. Immune cells specific for the tumor will be activated, grown and returned to the person with cancer where the immune cells provoke an immune response against the cancer. Cell types that can be used in this way are natural killer cells, lymphokine-activated killer cells, cytotoxic T cells and dendritic cells. The only cell-based therapy currently approved for use is Dendreon's Provenge, which is used for the treatment of prostate cancer.

However, Antibody therapies are currently the most successful form of immunotherapy, with many approved treatments for a wide range of cancers. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system that bind to a target antigen on the surface of a cell. In normal physiology they are used by the immune system to fight pathogens. Each antibody is specific to one or a few proteins and those that bind to cancer antigens are used in the treatment of cancer. Cell surface receptors are common targets for antibody therapies and include the epidermal growth factor receptor and HER2. Once bound to a cancer antigen, antibodies can induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, activate the complement system, prevent a receptor interacting with its ligand or deliver a payload of chemotherapy or radiation; all of which can lead to cell death. There are twelve antibodies currently approved for the treatment of cancer: Alemtuzumab, Bevacizumab, Brentuximab vedotin, Cetuximab, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Ibritumomab tiuxetan, Ipilimumab, Ofatumumab, Panitumumab, Rituximab, Tositumomab and Trastuzumab.

Interleukin-2 and interferon-α are examples of cytokines; proteins that regulate and coordinate the behaviour of the immune system. They have the ability to enhance the anti-tumor activity of the immune system and thus can be used as treatments in cancer. Interferon-α is used in the treatment of hairy-cell leukaemia, AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma, follicular lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia and malignant melanoma. Interleukin-2 is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.




Cytokine therapy
Cytokines are a broad group of proteins produced by many types of cells present within a tumor. They have the ability to modulate immune responses and are often utilised by the tumor to allow it to grow and manipulate the immune response. These immune-modulating effects allow them to be used as drugs to provoke an immune response against the tumor. Two commonly used groups of cytokines are the interferons and interleukins.[70]
Interferon[edit]

Interferons are cytokines produced by the immune system usually involved in anti-viral response, but also have use in the treatment of cancer. There are three groups of interferons (IFNs): type I (IFNα and IFNβ), type 2 (IFNγ) and the relatively newly discovered type III (IFNλ). IFNα has been approved for use in hairy-cell leukaemia, AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma, follicular lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia and melanoma. Type I and II IFNs have been researched extensively and although both types promote the anti-tumor effects of the immune system, only type I IFNs have been shown to be clinically effective in cancer treatment. IFNλ has been tested for its anti-tumor effects in animal models, and shows promise.[71][72]
Interleukins[edit]

Interleukins are a group of cytokines with a wide array of effects on the immune system. Interleukin-2 is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. In normal physiology it promotes both effector T cells (cells that produce the immune response) and T-regulatory cells (cells that repress the immune response), but its exact mechanism in the treatment of cancer is unknown.[70][73]

NOW THE NATURAL ROUTE....


 Plants, fungi, bacteria and marine organisms are potential sources of anti-cancer drugs. Plants and bacteria have been the most successful sources of drugs, which include anthracycline, the taxanes and vinca alkaloids. These drugs intercalate DNA and are known as cytotoxic drugs. In addition to these kinds of drugs, natural products are also known to stimulate the immune system, which can be utilized in the treatment of cancer.[79]

Certain compounds in medicinal mushrooms, primarily polysaccharide compounds, can up-regulate the immune system and have anti-cancer properties. Beta-glucans, such aslentinan, are known as "biological response modifiers", and their ability to activate the immune system is well documented. Specifically, beta-glucans stimulate the innate branch of the immune system. Research has shown beta-glucans have the ability to stimulate macrophage, NK cells, T cells, and immune system cytokines. The mechanisms in which beta-glucans stimulate the immune system is only partially understood. One mechanism in which beta-glucans are able to activate the immune system, is by interacting with theMacrophage-1 antigen (CD18) receptor on immune cells.[80] Agaricus subrufescens, (often mistakenly called Agaricus blazei), Lentinula edodes (Shiitake mushrooom), Grifola frondosa and Hericium erinaceus are fungi known to produce beta-glucans and have been tested for their anti-cancer potential.[79] Polysaccharide-K, isolated from Trametes versicolor, is another polysaccharide that has anti-cancer properties.[81][82]

Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare approved the use of Polysaccharide-K (produced by Coriolus versicolor) in the 1980s, to stimulate the immune systems of patients undergoing chemotherapy.[82] In Australia, a pharmaceutical based on a mixture of several mycological extracts including lentinan and Polysaccharide-K is sold commercially as MC-S.



Summary:
I use the above and below ideas (like immune system modulation) and find all readily available products that are not expensive on Lucy's Tippner Cancer Protocol that are found to have those properties.






 New and future immunotherapies
Anti-CD47 antibodies[edit]
Anti-CD47 antibodies, which block the protein CD47 from telling the cancer's host human immune system not to attack it, have been shown to eliminate or inhibit the growth of a wide range of cancers and tumors because CD47 is present on all known cancer cells (it is also present on many healthy cells of the body). After the cancer cells have been engulfed by macrophages, the host immune system's CD8+ T Cells become mobilized against the cancer and attack it on their own in addition to the macrophages, producing a personalized attack on virtually any form of cancer. When the immunotherapy technique was tested on human tumors transplanted in to mice, it stopped the spread of cancer 90 percent of the time and often eliminated all signs of the cancer. Phase 1 human trials are set to begin in 2014.[74][75][76]

Anti-GD2 antibodies


The GD2 ganglioside
Carbohydrate antigens on the surface of cells can be used as targets for immunotherapy. GD2 is a ganglioside found on the surface of many types of cancer cell including neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, melanoma, small cell lung cancer, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, liposarcoma, fibrosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and other soft tissue sarcomas. It is not usually expressed on the surface of normal tissues, making it a good target for immunotherapy to allow for specific action against the tumor and reduced toxicity. Phase I, II, and III trials are underway for antibody treatments that bind to this antigen.[77]

Immune checkpoint blockade
A ligand-receptor interaction that is currently being investigated as a target for cancer treatment is the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1; also known as CD279) and PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). In normal physiology PD-L1 on the surface of a cell binds to PD1 on the surface of an immune cell, which inhibits the activity of the immune cell. It appears that upregulation of PD-L1 on the cancer cell surface may allow them to evade the host immune system by inhibiting T cells that might otherwise attack the tumor cell. Antibodies that bind to either PD-1 or PD-L1 and therefore block the interaction may allow the T-cells to attack the tumor.

EGF receptor antibodies
Other anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in development include: ABX-EGF, hR3, and EMD 72000. Although they hold significant promise for the future, none of the agents are currently beyond phase I clinical trials.




Lucy never did radiation or chemo, she only did the Tippner Protocol. The Tippner Cancer Protocol combines immunotherapy and molecular cancer therapy using off the shelf readily available inexpensive natural substances. She is past 3 years after diagnosis by biopsy

I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found

May 3, 2014

Cancer of the Nasal and Paranasal Sinuses in Dogs


 Nasosinal Tumors

Description – Tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses consist of 1% of all canine neoplasms. The intranasal lesions mostly manifest themselves as adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. The remaining, however, comprise fibrosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma and undifferentiated sarcoma. Among them carcinomas and sarcomas are the most aggressive. At the time of diagnosis the rate of metastasis is usually low but at the time of death it is around 40% to 50%. The common metastatic sites are the regional lymph nodes and the lungs whereas the less common sites include the bones, kidneys, liver, skin and brain.

 Benign tumors like polyps and fibromas too have been found.

The average age of dogs with nasosinal tumors is 10 years. A predilection has been reported among medium and large breeds. 



Nasal Adenocarcinoma in Dogs

Nose cancer (or nasal adenocarcinoma) occurs when too many cells in the animal's nasal and sinus passages come together. The disease progresses slowly and occurs both in dogs and cats. Studies have shown nose cancer is more common in larger animal breeds than in smaller ones, and it may be more common in males than females. Options exist when the disease is caught early and aggressively treated.



Chondrosarcoma of the Nasal and Paranasal Sinuses in Dogs

A chondrosarcoma (CSA) is the second most common primary tumor in dogs, accounting for ten percent of all primary bone tumors. This is a malignant, invasive and fast spreading tumor in dogs. A CSA of the nasal and paranasal sinuses arises from the mesenchymal tissue, a connective collagenous tissue that is found throughout the body, and metastasizes to other parts of the body, including the nasal bones. It usually occurs on one side of the nasal cavity and extends to the other side over time.


Nasal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Dogs

Both the inside of the nose and the paranasal sinuses are covered in the same type of tissue, called the epithelium. The outer layer of this tissue is scale like, and is called the squamous epithelium. Tumors that grow from this squamous epithelium are called squamous cell carcinomas.

Squamous cell carcinomas are the second most common type of nasal tumor that dogs get. They usually grow slowly over several months. Most commonly, they occur on both sides of the nose, and it is common for this kind of cancer to spread to the bone and tissue near it. In some cases, this type of nasal tumor will spread to the brain, causing seizures. Squamous cell carcinomas in the nose and sinuses are usually seen in dogs over nine years old, but they have been seen in dogs as young as three years old.

Diagnosis

Your veterinarian will need a complete background medical history leading up to your dog's disease symptoms. Routine blood tests include a complete blood count, biochemistry profile, urinalysis and platelet count. The results may show normal levels. Your veterinarian will also examine the blood samples for evidence of fungal or bacterial infections. Aspergillus is sometimes found in dogs with nasal tumors.

Radiographic studies can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, but even this type of diagnostic method is challenging. Computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will often produce a more substantial image of the extent of invasion. An endoscope -- a tubular device with an attached camera that allows for a closer look at the diseased area -- can also be used examine the internal structure of the nasal canal, and may also be used to collect tissue specimens for biopsy, but because of the small space, this can be difficult. Other methods for collecting tissue and fluid samples may be employed, including fine needle aspiration, and suction. Biopsy is the only way to conclusively diagnose nasal cancer.

Your veterinarian may also take radiographs of other areas of the body to evaluate if metastasis is taking place.




Causes – The etiology of nasosinal tumors is largely unknown but some reports suggest that animals living in urban areas are at an increased risk. This is primarily due to the nasal filtering of pollutants. Exposure to passive smoking and fossil fuel combustion products like those produced by coal or kerosene heaters may accentuate the risk of this type of cancer.

Symptoms – Some of the most common clinical signs may include epistaxis (bloody nasal discharge), mucopurulent discharge (nasal discharge containing mucous and pus), facial deformity from bone erosion and subcutaneous extension of the tumor, sneezing, dyspnea (shortness of breath) or stertorous breathing (harsh noisy breathing), exophthalmus (abnormal protrusion of the eye) and ocular discharge due to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct (carries tears from the lacrimal sac into the nasal cavity).

On rare occasions animals with large tumors involving the caudal region of the nasal cavity may have neurological signs including seizures, behavioral changes, paresis (partial loss of movement), circling and obtundation (dog that does not have full mental capacity).



Treatment – By the time nasal carcinoma is detected, the disease has already become highly infiltrative. The degenerative nature of the disease and its critical location of the tumor near the brain and eyes renders it non-amenable to treatment and makes surgery impossible.  So, radiation therapy using high-energy mega voltage equipment is the only conventional treatment of choice for nasosinal tumors. It covers the entire nasal cavity, including, bone.

However, radiation has many disadvantages. The side effects of irradiation vary with protocols. Acute toxicities that result from irradiation include oral mucositis (inflammation and ulceration of the mouth), rhinitis (running nose), desquamation (shedding of the outer layers of the skin) and keratoconjunctivitis (inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva) and blepharitis (ocular disease characterized by inflammation of the eyelid margins).

This state of affairs continue for 2-8 weeks after therapy for which oral antibiotics and pain medications are prescribed. However, if oral mucositis, attains severe proportions, esophagostomy (surgical opening into the esophagus) and gastrostomy (surgical opening into the stomach) tube feedings may be needed in the short term.

Sometimes the side effects of radiation may set in late. But they can be even more dangerous than the acute ones. These may include cataracts (cloud that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye), keratitis (condition in which the cornea of the eye becomes inflamed), atrophy (wasting away of the part of the body), keratoconjunctivitis, anterior uvea, hemorrhage, degeneration, brain necrosis (brain death), seizures, optic nerve degeneration, osteonecrosis (bone collapse) and fibrosis (development of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ). Some complications develop late after therapy and are generally non-treatable.

Prognosis – Without treatment the prognosis for nasal carcinoma is approximately 3 months. The median survival time of dogs with epistaxis is 88 days whereas those without epistaxis is 224 days. The median survival time after surgery is 3-6 months. The median survival time with high voltage irradiation is 8-19.7 months.


Lucy received no radiation nor chemotherapy. She only received the Tippner Cancer Protocol. She is now past 3 years since diagnosis by biopsy of nasal adenocarcinoma and has virtually no symptoms.








Lucy never did radiation or chemo, she only did the Tippner Protocol. The Tippner Cancer Protocol combines immunotherapy and molecular cancer therapy using off the shelf readily available inexpensive natural substances. She is past 3 years after diagnosis by biopsy

I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found

April 30, 2014

Sixty-two percent of chemotherapy drugs come from


"Sixty-two percent of chemotherapy drugs come from natural products, and plants have been the basis of almost every new class of medication," Gary says. "It makes sense that these plants can act as anticancer agents."


  "In their exhaustion and desperation, they were trying to find an alternative treatment that was not so harsh," says Cohen, who often prescribed herbs to be prepared as teas to ease the side effects of chemo and hormone therapy. But the patients' oncologists, says Cohen, discouraged them from trying anything new. "They'd say Chinese medicine was quackery and that there was no evidence it worked," he says. Still, Cohen observed that many of the women to whom he gave Chinese herbs, including Ban Zhi Lian, responded well to the herbs and even experienced a relatively good quality of life. "At first I chucked it to luck," he says. "But then you see it's not just luck. And then you ponder why."



Case Reports I found to give some examples:
(Case reports are provided to have a better understanding of the product. Please be aware that the info was received from acupuncturists/ Chinese medicine doctors and was not reviewed by FDA. Drs. Gu from California and Lei from Arkansas contributed to the cases).
1. Female breast cancer patient, 45 years old. Blood test indicates a cancer cell index was as high as 22. Patient came to my office for TCM treatment because she does not want to go through surgery and chemotherapy treatment. I prescribed Tumoclear tablets for her to take orally and provided acupuncture and Qi-gong treatments. Her tumor was reduced in size significantly and the cancer cell index went down from 22 to 8. She has not undergone the excision surgery to date. Her condition is under the control completely.
2. Late stage lung cancer patient, Female, 70 years old. Patient was diagnosed to have only 3-month time to live by Western medicine doctors. She had to take morphine to reduce the agonizing pain but with unsatisfactory results. After visiting our place, taking Tumoclear tablets and receiving acupuncture and Qi-Gong treatments, she reported her pain was reduced greatly. Tumoclear does have the analgesic and stabilizing effects. The patient eventually died after 9 months. Her family was grateful that her pain was reduced and she passed away very peacefully.
3. Male patient, with metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma spreading to the brain. He was diagnosed by Western medicine doctors to have a 6-month survival time. Prescribed a large dose of Tumoclear from the start of the treatment. It has been more than two years since and his cancer is under control. He has been taking Tumoclear continuously under my supervision.
4. Female patient, 20 years old at the time of visit, had Pharyngeal cancer. Patient had gone through chemotherapy but the cancer relapsed. She had a whole body edema, accompanied by the jaundice. Prescribed Tumoclear at large doses from the start of the treatment in conjunction with Guang Ci Tang’s Qin Dan Hua Shi Pian. Also provided acupuncture and Qigong treatments. Now at age of 24, her cancer is completely under control.
5. Male, 45-year old, with pancreatic cancer. He had gone through chemotherapy treatment for approximately half a year without achieving apparent results. The size of the tumor was not reduced and at about 1.5cm. After coming to my clinic, she had since stopped the chemotherapy. Prescribed Tumoclear and Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma japonicum) in conjunction with acupuncture treatment. After three weeks treatment, the tumor had been reduced in size from 1.5cm to 0.3cm.
6. Female, 55 years old, with metastatic lung cancer spreading to the cerebrum. She did not undergo chemotherapy or radiotherapy and instead chose to receive TCM treatment at my clinic. Prescribed Tumoclear and Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma japonicum) in conjunction with acupuncture treatment. After five weeks treatment, the brain tumor had disappeared from a size of 0.9cm at the onset.



References
  • 1. Zhang Y. et al., Studies on Parmacology of Sarcandra glabra. Chinese Journal of the Practical Chinese with Modern Medicine, 2006 19:1839
  • 2. Zhu Y. et al., Journal of Emergency in Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2006 (5):533
  • 3. Carr C., Can Ancient Herbs Treat Cancer? Time 2007 Oct 15. Link
  • 4. Normile D., The New Face of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Science 2003 299:188.
  • by X. Li, Ph. D. (credentials)

I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found

March 28, 2014

Soy-Derived Isoflavones like GENISTEIN Inhibit the Growth of Canine Cancers



Soy May Aid In Treating Canine Cancers
Apr. 11, 2009 — Researchers at North Carolina State University are looking to soy as a way to make traditional canine cancer therapy more effective, less stressful for the dog and less costly for the owners.

Dr. Steven Suter, assistant professor of oncology, and NC State colleagues studied genistein - a molecule found in soy that has been shown to be toxic to a wide variety of cancer cells in humans - to determine whether it would also inhibit the growth of canine lymphoma cells.
The researchers found that a commercially available form of genistein called GCP was effective in killing canine lymphoid cells in a laboratory setting, and that GCP is "bioavailable" in canines - meaning it is absorbed into the bloodstream where it can affect cancer cells in the body. The researchers hope that their findings will lead to the use of GCP for their canine patients in conjunction with traditional cancer treatments like chemotherapy.
The researchers' findings were published in Clinical Cancer Research.
"Humans have been using soy in conjunction with traditional chemotherapy for some time as a chemo potentiator," Suter says. "This means that the GCP makes the chemotherapy work more efficiently and faster, which translates to less stress on the patient and less money spent on chemotherapy."
Since dogs absorb GCP in much the same way that humans do, Suter hopes that veterinarians will be able to offer this therapy to canine patients in the near future.
"Since GCP is a dietary supplement, it is harmless to patients," he adds. "Plus it's inexpensive and easy to administer in a pill form. There's really no downside here."


Soy-Derived Isoflavones Inhibit the Growth of Canine Lymphoid Cell Lines

-GENISTEIN supplements ( google it as canine lymphoma genistein and see what comes up). Genistein is an isoflavone extracted from soybeans. If you google it you'll find page after page of promising research -- especially on lymphoma and t-cell lymphoma. Among other things it caused the death of cancer cells without harming healthy ones. (Something chemo or radiation DON"T do)
I found one source so far that is pure genistein costs alot but it is pure and likely near what researchers use due to dosage and pureness
http://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-285872-vital-nutrients-genistein-125-mg-60-vegetarian-capsules?utm_source=wize&utm_medium=CPC&utm_term=VitalNutrients-Genistein125mg.-60VegetarianCapsules&utm_content=119420&utm_campaign=wize&mr:referralID=784998f6-77c8-11e3-9f1f-001b2166becc&




Here is one article:


  1. Vahbiz Jamadar-Shroff1,
  2. Mark G. Papich2 and
  3. Steven E. Suter1
+ Author Affiliations


  1. Authors' Affiliations: Departments of 1Clinical Sciences and 2Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, North Carolina

  1. Requests for reprints:
    Steven E. Suter, North Carolina State College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough Street, CVM Research Building #308, Raleigh, NC 27606. Phone: 919-513-0813; Fax: 919-513-7301; E-mail: 

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects of genistein, both pure genistein and a commercially available form of genistein called Genistein Combined Polysacharride (GCP), against two canine B-cell lymphoid cell lines and determine the oral bioavailability of GCP when fed to normal dogs.

Experimental Design: The in vitro effect of genistein and GCP was evaluated using cell proliferation and apoptotic assays. The IC50 of both compounds was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay and propidium idodide staining. Apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V staining, caspase 3 and 9 staining, and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis and Bcl-2/Bax ratios were also examined. An initial dose escalating pharmacokinetic study was used to determine if therapeutic serum levels of genistein could be reached with oral dosing of GCP in normal dogs.

Results: The 72-hour in vitro IC50 of genistein and GCP against the GL-1 and 17-71 cells were both 10 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL, respectively. GCP led to cell death in both cell lines via apoptosis and treated cells exhibited increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratios. The serum concentrations of genistein in normal dogs given increasing oral doses of GCP did not reach the 72-hour in vitro IC50 in a dose escalation study.

Conclusions: The results of these studies support the notion that canine high-grade B-cell lymphoma may represent a relevant large animal model of human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to investigate the utility of GCP in chemopreventive and/or treatment strategies that may serve as a prelude to human clinical lymphoma trials.

Translational Relevance

Canine lymphoma has historically been considered an excellent animal model of a variant of human non-Hodkin's lymphoma called diffuse, large B-cell lymphoma. Dogs are large, long-lived animals that are evolutionarily more closely related to humans than rodents; therefore, they represent an accessible, spontaneous population of high-grade lymphomas occurring in immunocompetent animals. Based on a large body of human literature documenting the antiproliferative effects of genistein, we hypothesized that genistein would also have in vitro activity against canine lymphoid cell lines and perhaps in vivo activity in canine lymphoma patients in either chemopreventive or treatment protocols. The results presented here support our hypothesis that genistein has significant in vitro antiproliferative activity against two well-established canine B-cell lines, mirroring human cell line data. Additionally, we developed an extremely sensitive high-pressure liquid chromatography–based assay to detect plasma genistein in dogs fed a commercially made, highly bioavailable form of genistein called Genistein Combined Polysacharride (GCP). With this assay, we were able to show that genistein in GCP can be absorbed by canine gut enterocytes, which leads to detectable genistein plasma levels. These initial studies with GCP lay the groundwork for future studies in the setting of canine lymphoma with findings that may be directly applicable to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. 

Genistein (4, 5, 7-trihydroxyisoflavone) is a readily available isoflavone found in soy-based products. Epidemiologic studies indicate that consumption of soy-containing diets is associated with a lower incidence of many human tumors (1, 2). Genistein has been identified as an inhibitor of various protein tyrosine kinases that play a role in cell growth and apoptosis, including camp-responsive element-binding protein (3), signal transducers and activators of transcription (4), members of the fork-head-related transcription factors (5), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB; ref. 6). At pharmacologic concentrations genistein's recorded activities also include topoisomerase I and II inhibition (7), antioxidant activity (8), induced differentiation (9), and deregulation of mitochondrial membrane pore permeability (10). 

Genistein's effects on various human solid cancer cell lines have been extensively studied (11). Although the precise molecular mechanisms responsible for these activities are not clearly understood, the compound can inhibit cancer cell growth (12, 13), induce apoptotic cell death with cell cycle arrest at G2-M phase, and inhibit angiogenesis (14). Genistein causes epigenetic changes in mouse prostate (15) and up-regulates mRNA expression of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene during mammary tumorigenesis (16). The compound also inhibits DNA methyltransferase and reverses the methylation status, with concomitant reexpression, of the p16INK4a, RARb, and MGMT genes in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and prostate cell lines (17).

Genistein is also active against human lymphoid neoplasia (18, 19). Genistein induces apoptosis via mitochondrial damage in T lymphoma cells (20) and via Akt signaling in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (21). The molecule also reduces NF-κb in T lymphoma cells via caspase-mediated cleavage of Iκβα (22). Finally, when included into a CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) lymphoma protocol, genistein has growth modulatory effects, via G2-M arrest and decreased NF-κb binding, in a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma xenograft setting (23). 

Natural and synthetic genistein glycosides are not easily absorbed across enterocytes in humans and cats (24, 25). Genistein Combined Polysacharride (GCP), a commercially available form of genistein (26), is a complex mixture produced by fermentation of soybean extracts with a mushroom mycelia (Ganoderma lucidum) culture that contains approximately 40% isoflavones. Fermentation deglycosylates soy isoflavones, producing aglycone isoflavones that are highly absorbable across the gut lumen (27). GCP has documented in vitro and in vivo effects on a wide variety of human cancers (28, 29). 

Case reports show complete regression of T3 prostate cancer following treatment with GCP (7); and supplementation with GCP prevented recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder (10).

Canine high-grade B-cell lymphoma, which is similar phenotypically and biologically to the most common variant of human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma called diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, is one of the most common malignant tumors of dogs (up to 25% of all cancers) and it is the most common hematopoietic tumor of the dog (83%; ref. 30). The median survival time of canine B-cell lymphoma patients treated with CHOP or L-VCAP (asparaginase, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, prednisone)-based protocols is 12 to 14 months, with an overall cure rate of <10% (31). Dogs are evolutionarily more closely related to humans than rodents and are large, long-lived animals; therefore, canine B-cell lymphoma represents an excellent model to investigate novel therapeutics and treatment strategies that may have direct applicability to the human disease (32). 

Based on the similarity between canine B-cell lymphoma and human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, we hypothesized that genistein would inhibit the cell growth of two well-established canine lymphoid B-cell lines. We show that genistein induces cell death via apoptosis at concentrations similar to those reported in the human literature. We also present our preliminary findings of the oral absorption of GCP in domestic dogs.



Soy-derived isoflavones inhibit the growth of canine lymphoid cell ...
by V Jamadar-Shroff - 2009 - Cited by 17 - Related articles
Feb 15, 2009 - EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The in vitro effect of genistein and GCP was ... the notion that canine high-grade B-celllymphoma may represent a ...






I found one source so far that is pure genistein costs alot but it is pure and likely near what researchers use due to dosage and pureness. My normal goto supplier, Swanson, does not carry a full strength pill.
http://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-285872-vital-nutrients-genistein-125-mg-60-vegetarian-capsules?utm_source=wize&utm_medium=CPC&utm_term=VitalNutrients-Genistein125mg.-60VegetarianCapsules&utm_content=119420&utm_campaign=wize&mr:referralID=784998f6-77c8-11e3-9f1f-001b2166becc&


**I will be starting genistein on Lucy's cancer on about 4/1/2014.  She was diagnosed in 4/2011 and has been taking the Tippner Protocol. I am adding a few new things because while she was in remission using only the pills on the Tippner cancer protocol, she has become stuffy again on the left side. Cancer can adapt and so must the protocol if needed. I will be adding genestein, luteolin, and apigen. I will have a research post on the luteolin and apigen soon.  The GCP version of genestein, I am still looking for a source.






I buy most of the stuff from Swanson Vitamins. They are cheaper, in capsules for dosage changes, and carry almost everything I give to Lucy except for the Chinese Herbs Stasis Breaker prescription, and the Low Dose Naltrexone prescription. Here is a $5 off coupon link I found